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Friday, January 27, 2017

FSU research links brain shape to personality differences


New research reveals the shape of our brain can provide surprising clues about how we behave and our risk of developing mental health disorders.



The traits include:

  • neuroticism, the tendency to be in a negative emotional state;
  • extraversion, the tendency to be sociable and enthusiastic;
  • openness, how open-minded a person is; agreeableness, a measure of altruism and cooperativeness; and conscientiousness, a measure of self-control and determination.

FSU research links brain shape to personality differences


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*** Neuroticism is a long-term tendency to be in a negative emotional state. People with neuroticism tend to have more depressed moods - they suffer from feelings of guilt, envy, anger, and anxiety more frequently and more severely than other individuals. Neuroticism is the state of being neurotic.


*** Extraversion is one of the five personality traits of the Big Five personality theory. It indicates how outgoing and social a person is. A person who scores high in extraversion on a personality test is the life of the party. They enjoy being with people, participating in social gatherings, and are full of energy.


*** An open-minded person is willing to try new things or to hear and consider new ideas.


Tuesday, January 24, 2017

Why Do People Living with Alzheimer's Want to Go Home?


Do Alzheimer's patients want to go home? Or are they longing for a time and place when they were safe and secure and knew everyone's name and face?





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Thursday, June 12, 2014

I gave up my career to care for my grandmother who has Alzheimer’s


When her grandmother developed dementia, Sophie Howarth, 26, quit her job and moved in as her carer – it was the best decision she ever made.


Of all the things you expect to be doing when you’re a 23-year-old ­graduate with a great job (and even better prospects), giving it all up to move in with your gran to care for her full time isn’t one of them.


New Lord Mayor wants dementia friendly streets




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